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American Eagle Paper Mills Wins 2017 AF&PA Sustainability Award for Water

Nov 06, 2017 WASHINGTON-The American Forest & Paper...

Recognized for Project Phoenix

WASHINGTON – The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) recognized American Eagle Paper Mills with a 2017 AF&PA Leadership in Sustainability Award for Water for their Project Phoenix. The award was presented at AF&PA’s annual meeting on Friday, Nov. 3 in Greensboro, Georgia.

“American Eagle’s Project Phoenix proves that intentional focus on increased efficiency benefits company operations – environmentally, socially and economically,” said AF&PA President and CEO Donna Harman.

American Eagle Paper Mills commissioned Project Phoenix to increase efficiency and reduce water use at their Tyrone, Pennsylvania, mill – one of the oldest working paper mills in the United States. Infrastructure updates resulted in an 83 percent reduction in total daily river and watershed water withdrawal; a 91 percent reduction in daily water consumption; and an 18.1 percent reduction in process water effluent per ton of paper produced.

“Thank you to AF&PA for recognizing Project Phoenix,” said American Eagle President and CEO Michael Grimm. “We are proud of the positive effects our efforts have had on our operations and our Tyrone community.”

Designed to recognize exemplary sustainability programs and initiatives in the paper and wood products manufacturing industry, AF&PA’s annual sustainability awards are given based on the merit of entries received across multiple categories.

Projects that support progress toward the Better Practices, Better Planet 2020 sustainability goals qualify for recognition in the “Leadership” category, which has five subcategories that correspond to the goals: Paper Recovery for Recycling, Energy Efficiency/Greenhouse Gas Reduction, Sustainable Forest Management, Safety, and Water. The “Innovation in Sustainability” award is reserved for projects that merit recognition for their contribution to sustainable business practices, not one of the goals specifically.

AF&PA releases its sustainability report every other year. The 2016 Sustainability Report showed that the U.S. pulp, paper, packaging, tissue and wood products manufacturing industry has made significant, measurable progress toward achieving its Better Practices, Better Planet 2020 sustainability goals.

Editor’s Note: Click here to retrieve photos (caption included) of the award winners.

About AF&PA

The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) serves to advance a sustainable U.S. pulp, paper, packaging, tissue and wood products manufacturing industry through fact-based public policy and marketplace advocacy. AF&PA member companies make products essential for everyday life from renewable and recyclable resources and are committed to continuous improvement through the industry’s sustainability initiative - Better Practices, Better Planet 2020. The forest products industry accounts for approximately four percent of the total U.S. manufacturing GDP, manufactures over $200 billion in products annually, and employs approximately 900,000 men and women. The industry meets a payroll of approximately $50 billion annually and is among the top 10 manufacturing sector employers in 45 states. Visit AF&PA online at www.afandpa.org or follow us on Twitter @ForestandPaper.

About American Eagle Paper Mills

American Eagle Paper Mills is the leading US producer of recycled uncoated freesheet papers, including office, printing and converting grades. Located in Tyrone PA, the mill was restarted in 2003 by a group of local investors, having been shuttered by MeadWestvaco in 2001. The mill employs approximately 240 proud Pennsylvania papermakers, who transform 300 tons of waste paper each day into premium recycled paper. To learn more about American Eagle Paper Mills and our sustainability story please visit www.aepaper.com.

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American Eagle-Ready to Compete for Another Century

TYRONE, PA September 20, 2017 (Paper360 by Graeme Roddin) Greek mythology describes the phoenix as the bird that is cyclically regenerated or reborn; typically the phoenix rises from the ashes. In this story the phoenix is an eagle-American Eagle Paper Mills, Tyrone PA. It began Project Phoenix in 2013 to “reinvent the mill’s critical infrastructure by primarily focusing on efficiency”

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American Eagle Paper Mills joins EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership

TYRONE, PA, Aug. 24, 2017 (PR.com) -American Eagle Paper Mills today announced that it joined the SmartWay Transport Partnership, an innovative collaboration between U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry that provides a framework to assess the environmental and energy efficiency of goods movement supply chains.

American Eagle Paper Mills will contribute to the Partnership’s savings of 170.3 million barrels of oil, $24.9 billion in fuel costs, 72.8 MMT of carbon dioxide (CO2), 1,458,000 tons of nitrogen oxides, and 59,000 tons of particulate matter. This is equivalent to eliminating annual energy use in over 6 million homes. Carbon dioxide is the most common greenhouse gas, and nitrogen oxide is an air pollutant that contributes to smog. By joining SmartWay Transport Partnership, American Eagle Paper Mills demonstrates its strong environmental leadership and corporate responsibility.

“As an industry leader in sustainable papermaking, American Eagle Paper Mills continually looks for ways to manufacture, package and deliver our recycled papers with minimal impact on our shared natural resources. Our partnership with Smartway is a tangible demonstration of our effort to deliver our papers in the most environmentally efficient way possible, minimizing our overall environmental footprint,” said Mike Grimm, President and CEO of American Eagle Paper Mills.

Developed jointly in early 2003 by EPA and Charter Partners represented by industry stakeholders, environmental groups, American Trucking Associations, and Business for Social Responsibility, this innovative program was launched in 2004. Partners rely upon SmartWay tools and approaches to track and reduce emissions and fuel use from goods movement. The Partnership currently has over 3,000 Partners including shipper, logistics companies, truck, rail, barge, and multimodal carriers.

American Eagle Paper Mills is the leading US producer of recycled uncoated freesheet papers, including office, printing and converting grades. Located in Tyrone PA, the mill was restarted in 2003 by a group of local investors, having been shuttered by MeadWestvaco in 2001. The mill employs approximately 240 proud Pennsylvania papermakers, who transform 300 tons of waste paper each day into premium recycled paper. To learn more about American Eagle Paper Mills and our sustainability story please visit aepaper.com.

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American Eagle Paper Mills CEO Mike Grimm Receives Global Paper Industry Recognition

TYRONE, PA, August 18, 2017 (RISI) - American Eagle Paper Mills President and CEO, Michael Grimm, was named for the second year in a row to the RISI Top 50 Power List of executives that hold considerable influence in the global pulp and paper industry. The list was compiled by RISI, the leading information provider for the global forest products industry. The list is published annually in Paper 360, a magazine covering the paper industry worldwide. The Top 50 Power list is chosen by the magazine’s editors, staff, and selected leaders within the paper business.


This sustained recognition highlights American Eagle Paper Mills success despite the mills small size and the challenges of a declining uncoated freesheet paper market. Mike has led the company forward with continued investment in energy and resource efficiency, positioning American Eagle Paper Mills as the leading and most environmentally sustainable recycled paper mill in North America. CEO Mike Grimm says, “Sustainability is at the cornerstone of our strategic path forward. Natural resource and fiber sustainability, community sustainability, and economic sustainability are all critically important to our company and to our country. American Eagle Paper Mills continues to expand our Eagle Family of uncoated recycled papers which allow our customers to demonstrate their own sustainability commitments. “ About American Eagle Paper Mills American Eagle Paper Mills is the leading US producer of recycled uncoated freesheet papers, including office, printing and converting grades. Located in Tyrone PA, the mill was restarted in 2003 by a group of local investors, having been shuttered by MeadWestvaco in 2001. The mill employs approximately 240 proud Pennsylvania papermakers, who transform 300 tons of waste paper each day into premium recycled paper. To learn more about American Eagle Paper Mills and our sustainability story please visit aepaper.com

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American Eagle Paper Mills CEO Mike Grimm named to top 100 People List by PA Business Central

STATE COLLEGE, PA, January 27, 2017-Year after year, it has been Pennsylvania Business Central’s honor to celebrate the top 100 people in business and economic development who have learned through failures and successes how to develop both their organizations and communities. American Eagle Paper Mills CEO Mike Grimm was named one of those top 100 people in business.

PA Business Central article..



Year after year, it has been Pennsylvania Business Central’s honor to celebrate the top 100 people in business and economic development who have learned through failures and successes how to develop both their organizations and communities. American Eagle Paper Mills CEO Mike Grimm was named one of those top 100 people in business.



Uncoated Freesheet: 'Small guy' American Eagle mill still rolling behind an energy upgrade, flexibility

OAKLAND, CA, Sept. 23, 2016 (PPI Pulp &Paper Week) - An ongoing 45% demand decline on uncoated freesheet (UFS) paper in North America since 2000 has not deterred American Eagle Paper Mills.


The 90,000 tons/yr mill in central Pennsylvania with a long, colorful history remains fixated and growing in UFS.

In the last two years, the company spent $15 million on a critical coal to natural gas boiler project that significantly reduces the mill's production cost, opened a new warehouse, and started up a second cutsize sheeter. Further, company CEO Mike Grimm, who started at American Eagle Paper in early 2013, sees continuing interest and growth potential in 100% recycled-content office/copy paper, which is an American Eagle staple. In 2015, for example, the city of New York started using 100% recycled-content office paper at its government offices.

Next week, American Eagle Paper celebrates the capital spending advancements. More than 100 guests are expected, including bankers and politicians. The mill in Tyrone, first erected in 1880, was shut in the fall of 2001 by Westvaco – while Westvaco and Mead combined in a $3 billion merger that was completed in early 2002.

2003 restart. Former mill personnel manager John Ferner led an investor group Team Ten LLC that acquired the Tyrone assets in July 2003 and the mill, which had made both uncoated and coated printing and writing papers, restarted as an UFSonly operation in November 2003.

The same challenge as in 2003 remains today, according Grimm. American Eagle Paper's share of the North American UFS market is 1%.

"The challenge we all face is a declining market," he said. "For us, we must sell in the right places … with a flexible operation that can do a number of different things – all with the same overhead structure."

"I didn't grow up in this industry," said Grimm. "What's the future going to look like in terms of the supply of paper? Is it going to be coming out of a few large systems only or also localized systems that are scaled. My gut tells me that mill operations that can produce products that serve several segments of the market while being very efficient will succeed."

Since 2013, along with the demand decline from mobile device use that replaces print on paper, five US UFS producers – –including the largest four – –shut down almost 1.5 million tons/yr of capacity. That 1.5 million represents 17% of today's North American demand.

Grimm said a tour of the Tyrone mill next week will start at the legacy 1957 boiler house that is eight stories tall. The newly-installed Babcock and Wilcox natural gas package boiler is much smaller, emblematic of the mill's changes. The reduced energy footprint of the mill led to the shuttering of the 60-year-old power generation equipment as well.

The mill negotiated a five-year electricity contract at a cost that is lower than what it would cost American Eagle to produce the power on-site at the mill with existing equipment, Grimm said.

"This is a solid five-year plan allowing us to cut cost and focus our capital on our business vs overleveraging to make power. We can circle back in the future and reinvest in co-gen at a later time," he said.

The old equipment shut July 10 and the new boiler starting running on July 16. No longer is the mill a 70,000 tons/yr coal consumer paying to landfill 10,000 tons/yr of coal ash. Its emissions declined by 70%. Its water usage was cut by 82% or a staggering 11.5 million gallons per day.

New grades. The mill's two paper machines are non-pulp integrated, running primarily on pulp from recovered paper including hard white envelope cuttings. The 152-in-wide trim machine No. 3, a Pusey and Jones unit installed in 1950, and 84-in PM 4, also a Pusey and Jones unit but installed in 1910, make office/copy, offset, envelope, and reply card papers. This week, Grimm added that the company is shipping some new grades of paper never made before on the mill's machines. "We're not going anywhere. We are continuing to grow and adapt continuously. The small guy can be successful," he said.



Tyrone Mill Showcases New Gas Boiler

TYRONE,PA Sept. 29, 2016 (The Daily Herald-Sean Sauro)


Tyrone Mill Showcases New Gas Boiler

By Sean Sauro

TYRONE ­ The press of a button sounded a whistle Thursday morning outside American Eagle Paper Mills, symbolizing the installation of new technology and a move toward the future.

Mill officials opened their new warehouse and customer service center to the public ­ including local politicians and business leaders ­ to highlight a new natural gas boiler that replaced aging equipment and improved operations.

"Shortly after I took the reins in 2013, I realized we had a big problem to deal with," said Mike Grimm, the mills' president and CEO. "It was one of those problems that keep you up at night. The type of problem that just doesn't go away when the market improves."


The problem, he said, was that the mills' power infrastructure was installed in 1957 and had been operating almost continuously since then. The critical piece of equipment ­ a coal­stoker fire boiler ­ was nearing the end of its life, and there was "limited capital to solve such a problem," Grimm said. Still, through due diligence and a competent leadership team, Grimm said he found that a solution was not out of reach.

"We found something in the end that really wasn't that complicated," he said. "The key to that solution was efficiency." This summer, the new boiler ­ a $3.5 million update ­ was completely installed, Grimm said. "I've been a project guy my whole career, and I can tell you this was the best executed project I've ever worked on," Grimm said. "The interesting part is this was engineered and built up mostly by our own employees." In addition to keeping the mill running and employees employed, the paper­manufacturing operation has been made more environmentally responsible as a result of recent advancements, Grimm said. Greenhouse gas emission have been reduced 70 percent annually, and the amount of water withdrawn from local water sources also has been reduced drastically.

That reduction, Grimm said, is about 11,532,000 gallons per day or 4,209,180,000 gallons annually. "We've made a profound environmental impact as the result of this project. ... This is a remarkable success story of how a small company can make a big difference," he said. Present innovations were an obvious focal point Thursday, but the past was not absent from the presentation.

Displays set up in the warehouse chronicled the business' 136 years. And Grimm took time during his speech to reflect, especially on hard times, including a span from 2001­03 when the mill closed. However, Grimm also talked about the group of leaders and investors that brought the business back into production.

"This is a story of incredible individuals from a local community that came together to set this course. The leadership and persistence of a handful of people is why we're here today," he said. Among those mentioned were former Altoona­Blair County Development Corp. President and CEO Marty Marasco, former state Sen. Robert Jubelirer and former state Secretary of Agriculture Samuel Hayes Jr. ­ each of them spoke at the ceremony. "I've had the opportunity to work with some great people," Marasco said. "I'm most proud to have had the opportunity to work with this group of great people ... but the real heroes are the investment group and the management group." Jubelirer also commented on those leaders' ability bring the business back to success.

"The future of Tyrone literally depended on whether this mill would open again," he said. "What you can accomplish if you work together my goodness gracious, you can get a lot done." And lastly, Hayes praised American Eagle Paper Mills' past and present employees, who he called "hardworking people that turned out a good product." Hayes' comments took him back to his youth. "Everyday in those schoolboy years, I was in class with the sons and daughters of the paper makers. And they were proud of their fathers and their mothers who worked at this mill," he said. "Make no mistake, I made note of the fact that my classmates were proud to be from a paper­making family." Eventually, Grimm turned his speech to the company's future, which he said looks advantageous with the mills' continued focus on modern methods, such as producing recycled paper.

"The recycled market is actually growing; it's not shrinking," Grimm said. "We are succeeding in innovating while being a small U.S. manufacturer." At the event's conclusion, several officials gathered to press a button that sounded a whistle, which had been silent since renovations began. The whistleblowing took the place of the typical ribbon cutting, Grim said. "The paper whistle means many things to many people. ... After today, the whistle will blow again," he said.

Mirror Staff Writer Sean Sauro is at 946­7535.

The American Eagle Paper Mill: A rich history, a bright future

The American Eagle Paper Mill is a significant piece of Tyrone history. Since the paper mill opened in 1880, many in Tyrone have found their livelihoods in the mill. Both the paper mill and the railroad had a great economic impact on the town and its residents.

We began looking back at the paper mill a few weeks ago in order to honor the past, while celebrating the present and looking towards the bright future for the mill and its people. In this photo recently discovered in a box of historic memorabilia at the mill, names were handwritten on the back. Some of the writing was a bit difficult to read, so we apologize that some of the names may be misspelled.


The names listed are Walter Chronister, W. C. Owens, Bill Glenny, Oliver Ormsby, Karl Getz, Bennie Parks, Roy Bohns, S. Gripp, Ed Skeys, Chas Davidson, Wid Maschke, Mable Snyder, Elizabeth Louder, Peg Woomer, Lois Beam, Betty Merritts, Eleanor Skeys, Bell McNelius.

Maybe one of them is a relative of yours. If you have any knowledge of any of the people listed, we would enjoy hearing your story as we take this step back in time. From those who served to blow the whistle, to those whose jobs were counting papers (also known as "counter girls"), to those who ran the machinery, all might have stories to tell.

The American Eagle Paper Mill is also interested in finding those who are among the oldest living employees who had worked at the mill. If you have any historical information to share regarding the paper mill, please contact the Herald at (814) 684-4000, stop in our office along Pennsylvania Avenue, or send e-mail to the following address jwhite@thedailyherald.net

Mirror Staff Writer Sean Sauro is at 946­7535.

Tyrone Mill Recognized with 2015 Notopoulos Award

ALTOONA,PA May 20, 2016 (abcdcorp.org) American Eagle Paper Mills of Tyrone received the 2015 Alexander A. Notopoulos Award on Friday at the annual meeting of the Altoona-Blair County Development Corp.

The award is given annually to an outstanding Blair County business Link to article..


American Eagle Paper Mills Recognized as Governor’s ImPAct Award Nominee

The American Eagle Paper Mill is a significant piece of Tyrone history. Since the paper mill opened in 1880, many in Tyrone have found their livelihoods in the mill. Both the paper mill and the railroad had a great economic impact on the town and its residents.


As success stories go, it’s clearly one worth re-telling.


Some Towns Rebound,Others Wither, As Manufacturing Declines

ATLOONA,PA May 6, 2017 (US NEWS)

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Bales of Success

TYRONE,PA Sept.23,2013 (Altoona Mirror)

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